Beyond Words: How Slogans and Taglines Enhance Your Brand’s Messaging.

Have you ever been captivated by a jingle that burrowed into your brain like a catchy ear worm? Or perhaps a single phrase, whispered in a movie trailer, sent shivers down your spine? That, my friends, is the power of well-crafted brand messaging, condensed into the bite-sized brilliance of a slogan or tagline.

Think about it: in a world bombarded by sensory overload, how do you make your brand stand out from the cacophony of shouting competitors? How do you capture the essence of your company in a way that resonates with your audience, leaving them wanting more (and maybe even reaching for their wallets)?

Enter the humble slogan or tagline. These little powerhouses pack a punch, working overtime to:

  • Spark curiosity: A well-crafted tagline can be like a cryptic riddle, piquing interest and inviting exploration. Think of Nike’s “Just Do It.” Short, sweet, and bursting with potential interpretations, it leaves the door open for everyone to find their own meaning.
  • Evoke emotions: The best taglines tap into the emotional core of your brand. Imagine the feeling of biting into a juicy apple when you hear “Think Different” (Apple), or the sense of security washing over you with “Melts in your mouth, not in your hand” (M&Ms). These taglines don’t just describe a feeling, they create an experience.
  • Memorability matters: Let’s face it, in today’s fast-paced world, attention spans are as fleeting as a butterfly flitting through a field of wildflowers. A catchy tagline, like a sweet melody, sticks in your mind long after the initial encounter. “Can you hear me now?” (Verizon) anyone?

Famous slogans and taglines

Crafting the perfect slogan or tagline is an art form, requiring a sprinkle of creativity, a dash of wit, and a whole lot of brand understanding. But fear not, you’ve landed on the brighter side of branding. Here are some well known slogans and taglines to get you in the mood.

So, the next time you’re brainstorming ways to amplify your brand’s voice, remember the power of the slogan or tagline. These concise yet potent phrases can be the difference between a brand that blends into the background and one that leaves a lasting impression. And this is not just for consumer brands because engineers and scientists are people too.

Don’t let your brand message get lost in the noise. The wordsmiths at Brighter Naming love doing taglines and slogans, since they can work in short sentences for a change – rather than just one or two words. And they know their process works. It involves your team intimately of course. But they do the heavy lifting and give you a decent list of options to sort through, to test and to tweak.

Before we were namers, we were marketeers. Before we were linguists, we were educators. And we have people who have (and still do) live on multiple continents for a truly global view. So we can help you craft a short, sweet, punchy, direct slogan or tagline. We play the role of the customer, client or consumer that has a very limited attention span. So the goal is usually for a short, sweet tagline that is six words or less and does not repeat any of the words so that it can be read instantly on a billboard while driving by at speed.

Click here, and let’s start crafting a tagline for your company or slogan for your product or service. When the results are really unique and you are sure you want to use and protect it for a long time, we can advise on related protection and trademark issues too. After all, our own tagline is The Power of ®

…. Gareth Dodgson

Posted in Branding, Consumer Goods, International Naming, Naming News, Slogans/Taglines, Sustainable Brand Names

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See his industry naming commentary (where he takes a critical look at names) via the blog on this site